Making History with Gingerbread Houses

06
Dec
2017

Gingerbread Houses Making History

Although decorated gingerbread treats had been created for years, the first gingerbread houses were made in Germany during the 16th century.  Many experts believe it was the result of the children’s fairy tale, Hansel & Gretel by the Brothers Grimm.  Other food experts believe they simply wrote about something that already existed.  Whatever inspired the first gingerbread house, creating an edible house, beautifully decorated with sweet ingredients, has been popular ever since.   It even has its own day.  December 12 is observed annually as National Gingerbread House Day.

 

World Record Gets Bigger in Texas

In 2013, The Traditions Club and St Joseph Health System in Bryan, TX broke the Guinness World Record for the largest gingerbread house.  Their house measured 60 feet long by 42 feet deep and was up to 20 feet high.  Although it started with a wood base, it took 1800 pounds of butter, 7200 eggs, 3000 pounds of sugar, 7200 pounds of flour, 22,000 pieces of candy, and a ton of volunteers. The giant effort was put to good use.  The house was a holiday tourist attraction and the proceeds went toward a new trauma facility.

Your gingerbread house won’t be as big and certainly won’t be more than 35 million calories, but take the time to gather your family and make some history together.  The value can be immeasurable.

Enjoy Swedish Gingerbread This Year

American Dream Cakes will have their traditional Swedish gingerbread, called pepparkakor, again this year.  Learn more about it and make sure you place your order for Sara’s Pepparkakor treats today.

Gingerbread Facts:

  • It’s believed gingerbread making was introduced in Europe by the crusaders returning from Eastern Mediterranean.
  • It’s recorded that an Armenian Monk, Gregory of Nicopolis, introduced gingerbread baking to Christians in France in 992 AD. They were shaped, decorated, and often used in religions celebrations.
  • Gingerbread has many names – one for each country where it’s found.
  • Some thought gingerbread had medicinal properties. In 1444, it was recorded Swedish nuns made gingerbread to ease indigestion.
  • Gingerbread arrived in America with the colonists. Even George Washington’s mother had her own recipe and served it to the Marquis de Lafayette when he visited her home in Fredericksburg, Virginia.
  • The Bakers Guild no long controls the making of gingerbread, so have fun designing your own special creation “guild-free.”

Make memories with this delicious recipe and your family!

 

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